LMS Coaches in Preservation

Photograph 592: Derek Mason

Photograph 592: Derek Mason

DB999501 is not what it seems. A batch of these vehicles was constructed to LMS diagram 2046 (RCE District Engineers Saloon) on lot 3093 at Swindon in 1957. They appear very similar to their LMS cousins but have many detail differences not the least the interiors which are more akin to Mark 1 interior materials than those usually associated with LMS inspection saloons. However they do represent the last 'reproductions' of any LMS design brought into service with the nationalised railway.

Photograph 588: Derek Mason

Photograph 588: Derek Mason

M44408 steam heating van is pictured in a demonstration train at Goathland in the early 1990s. The vehicle started life as a 'two window' all-metal open third of which 200 were built during 1925-6 and in which form they survived until the early 1960s. 23 vehicles were converted between 1958 and 1963 into steam heating vans as part of the 1960 Manchester to Crewe electrification scheme. The new AC locos provided for the scheme could not provide steam heating hence a stopgap solution was required as most locomotive hauled stock on the Euston, Crewe, Manchester and Glasgow services remained steam heated. The vans became a familiar site on service trains during this period surviving only until electrically heated stock became generally available. Some were later deployed as carriage preheating vans for service stock in sidings and in some termini.

Photograph 587: Derek Mason

Photograph 587: Derek Mason

The Severn Valley Railway has the only restored rake of LMS carriages operating in the country and it is a real pleasure to be able to experience a ride in it. If you are interested you can ring up and find out when it operates, it will be a day trip well spent! The train is seen here a few years ago and stabled at Kidderminster south yard out in the open and in the pouring rain, not the best place to be during the long winter months. The site is now the location of the new carriage shed and these heritage coaches are now protected from the invasive and detrimental properties of the rain and sun.

Photograph 581: Derek Mason

Photograph 581: Derek Mason

26986 a Porthole Brake Corridor Third seen at Highley some years ago. Although LMS in design it was built by British Railways at Wolverton Works in 1950 and rescued from Worcester in 1971 whilst in BR blue and grey livery. Here it is seen in the 1947 livery into which it was repainted at Bewdley in 1972.

Photograph 582: Derek Mason

Photograph 582: Derek Mason

26986 again from the other end. These particular BR built LMS designs incorporated some steel framework, notably to replace the wooden stringer along the body bottom sides, the corner posts and the cantrail. This was constructed no doubt as a precursor to the use of this material in the later all-steel LMS and British Railways Mark 1 carriages. Some of the later BR vehicles to LMS design even included standard Beclawat all-glass droplights as used in the Mark 1 stock built from 1951 onwards, examples of which can be seen on the LMS stock located in the SRPS museum at Boness in Scotland.

Photograph 583: Derek Mason

Photograph 583: Derek Mason

2300 was purchased by the Severn Valley Railway from Bass Charrington's depot in Plymouth being completely stripped of all internal fittings. 2300's interior was eventually restored by utilising the interior from sister vehicle 13045 which being in much poorer condition was subsequently scrapped.

Photograph 584: Derek Mason

Photograph 584: Derek Mason

12992 is an identical vehicle to 2300 above but was purchased intact in 1972 and ran from then until 1984 when it was withdrawn for a full overhaul. This view shows the compartment or non-corridor side. There are seven compartments each seating six with seat arms down or eight at a pinch with them up, two toilets are provided one at either end of the coach. The coach looks resplendent in the summer sunshine at Highley, a tribute to all the voluntary hard work.

Photograph 585: Derek Mason

Photograph 585: Derek Mason

27220 was bought as part of a 'bulk' purchase of seven vehicles from Didcot by the Severn Valley Railway in 1968. Three post-war open thirds being 27220, together with 27218 and 27270 were part of this deal all were built at Wolverton between 1945-6. They have 56 seats with the two tiny toilets plus tip-up sinks at one end squeezed either side of  the narrow corridor. All three of these coaches remain in regular service with the Severn Valley.

Photograph 586: Derek Mason

Photograph 586: Derek Mason

Important connections William Stanier came to the LMS in 1932, it was not long before he authorised new designs of locomotives more suited to the requirements of the largest of the 'Big-Four'. The carriages, then derived from the Midland Railway and London and North Western Railway designs also came under his scrutiny and the GWR influence together with features of the then existing designs created a new style which was to last for the remaining lifetime of the LMS. One change made by Stanier was the incorporation of suspended or 'hanging' gangways rather than the Standard British scissor type used previously. The new suspended type is shown here.

Photograph 509: Derek Mason

Photograph 509: Derek Mason

5987 At Carnforth, but this time undercover in the old Motive Power Depot is the National Railway Museum's Stanier Brake Third Corridor built at Derby in 1937. Recovered intact from Ashford in the 1970s and subsequently restored to original condition, it was planned to use 5987 as part of the National Railway Museum's proposed LMS main line train which unfortunately for various reasons did not materialise. After restoration at Carnforth and years of storage there 5987 returned to the National Railway Museum early in 2001 and is engaged in limited public use and display in the confines of the yard.